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What Is Grounding?

source: http://www.jackkruse.com/emf-1-does-your-rolex-work/2/

The Earth is negatively charged. It has an endless supply of negative-charged free electrons. Anytime you have two conductive objects and they make contact, such as your bare feet and the ground, electrons will flow from the place where they are abundant to the place where there are fewer of them. The electrical potential of the two objects will thus equalize. That describes grounding simply.

The land and seas of planet Earth are alive with an endless and constantly replenished supply of electrons. Since all life makes direct contact with the surface of the planetthe skin of our bodies touching the skin of the Earth–our conductive bodies naturally equalize with the Earth. Figuratively speaking, we refill the electron level in our tank that has become low. How do we know that the body absorbs those electrons? In the 2005 study listed above it was proved with a simple experiment. Mr. Applewhite showed a voltage drop across an in-line resistor, measured with an oscilloscope, provided ample evidence of an exchange of electrons between the Earth and the body during grounding.

In North America, the power grid produces EMFs vibrating at 60Hz. This frequency alone is way above the natural resonance of the earth and the brain. Existing wires inside the walls of our homes produce EMFs even when appliances are not connected. The potential for interference of our internal communication system in our bodies varies from person to person and in different locations, depending on the intensity of the fields and how electron depleted we already are. Within an ungrounded body, electrons and other charged particles react with the environmental EMFs present in the immediate surroundings producing unnatural molecular perturbations. When a person is grounded to earth, the body is shielded from these perturbations by the Earth’s electrons. The Applewhite study we just described showed that when the body is directly connected and ‘plugged’ into the Earth, it is essentially shielded from electropollution. An EMF has both an electric and a magnetic field, and the difference between the two and their effects on the body are determined by the bodies current energy supply of free electrons from food and their own ATP production in mitochondria.

The findings of a team of researchers from the Imperial College in London and the University of Washington’s Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, in a 2007 report, said that measurements in an office setting showed that the electrical energies people are exposed to indoors for large periods of time escalate the risk of infection, stress, and degenerative diseases, and reduce oxygen uptake and activity levels. And I quote, ‘The nature of the electromagnetic environments that most humans are now regularly exposed to has changed dramatically over the past century and often bears little resemblance to those created in Nature’. ‘In particular, the increased masking/shielding/insulation of individuals from beneficial types of natural electromagnetic phenomena, the presence of synthetic materials that can gain strong charge and increase exposures to inappropriate electric field levels and polarities have greatly altered the electromagnetic nature of the microenvironments many individuals usually occupy.’ These environmental signs of EMF are codified by the magnetic cells in all life’s suprachiamatic nucleus (SCN) to give the brain another dimension of time to time the biochemical reactions of life for survival. The brain uses natural EMF resonance with light and dark to tell time. It is our brains Rolex.

..Every electromagnetic field has its own vibrational (oscillations) pattern that dictates fluxes, kinetics, and biochemistry. This means how the EMF field interact with proton, electron, and neutrons in our cells . Once the EMF changes from its base state, the Schumann vibration, then it means all biochemical behavior must also change. This change causes molecular chaos in a system. We call that inflammation.

source: http://www.jackkruse.com/emf-1-does-your-rolex-work/2/

Modern Bedding: A Toxic Nightmare

Modern Bedding: A Toxic Nightmare

Flame retardant chemicals are in almost everything: Not only in our TV’s, clothing, furniture, carpets and electronic equipment; they are also in our air, water, food and our own bodies. Their levels are especially high in our babies and children, because children eat, drink and breathe more than adults. These chemicals disrupt our thyroid function, immune systems, brain development and can possibly cause cancers. Human blood and tissue levels of these toxins have been doubling every two and a half years in the USA.

What are these chemicals and what can you do to protect yourself and your family from their effects?The manufacturers aren’t required to put the fire retardant chemicals on the label. The most commonly used chemicals, and their health hazards are:

* Boric acid – Inhaling the dust can cause headaches, coughing, dizziness or difficulty breathing. Prolong contact may cause skin sensitization.

* PBDE’s – are prohibited in the European Union after high levels were found in breast milk. California has decided to phase out the use of two of these, penta and octa PBDE by 2008. PBDEs accumulate in the body tissues and cause thyroid hormone disruption, permanent learning and memory impairment, decreased sperm count, fetal malformations, behavioral changes, hearing deficiencies and possibly cancer. U.S. women have levels in their body tissues 50 times more than European women. (For more eye-opening information, click on the link at the end of this report to “Our Stolen Future” Website containing results of a study of PBDEs).

* Formaldehyde – the U.S. Consumer Product and Safety Commission states in a report on urethane insulation, “Many health complaints, including irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin, headaches and shortness of breath, have been reported to CPSC over the last several years by consumers who have had UFFI in their homes. Less frequently reported symptoms include chest pain, diarrhea, nausea, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Studies have shown that formaldehyde in liquid solution (and possibly formaldehyde gas) can, through repeated exposure, cause sensitization in certain individuals. When exposed to formaldehyde gas, sensitized individuals may exhibit allergic dermatitis or mild-to-severe asthmatic reactions.” This was talking about formaldehyde outgassing from insulation. The same effects would occur from exposure to formaldehyde outgassing while you are sleeping in your bed. CPSC considers formaldehyde to be a potential human carcinogen.

* Decabromodipheyl Oxide – is a developmental toxicant. Exposing mothers to it during pregnancy can cause the death of or disrupt the development of the fetus. It causes birth defects and low birth weight. Behavioral or psychological problems can appear as the child grows.

* Melamine – is a reproductive toxicant, which can cause premature menopause, decreases in male and female fertility, onset of puberty, and changes in menstruation, gestation time, and lactation. It is a development toxicant with all of the hazards of Decabromodiphyl Oxide mentioned above. It is a cardiovascular and blood toxicant. This affects the ability of red blood cells to carry oxygen, white blood cells to fight disease, abnormal heartbeat, decreased blood flow, and elevated blood pressure.

* Antimony – The Australian Government Department of Environment and Heritage says of antimony,” Antimony compounds show toxic properties similar to those of arsenic. This depends on how much antimony a person has been exposed to, for how long, and current state of health. Exposure to high levels of antimony can result in a variety of adverse health effects. Breathing high levels for a long time can irritate eyes and lungs and can cause heart and lung problems, stomach pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach ulcers. Ingesting large doses of antimony can cause vomiting. When eaten by mold or mildew, antimony releases a poisonous gas called stibine. This gas has caused epidemics of deaths in the past.

These are a few of the chemicals used as fire retardants. Polyols, toluene diisocyante, amines, siloxanes, styrene, limonene, benzene and many others are also used. If you find any chemicals listed on your mattress label, you can search the web for more information. Write the chemical in the search box adding a comma, then write “health hazard.” But you can’t trust the label, because by law therre is no requirement to list any or all of the ingredients.

Click here for more information on the chemical hazards of modern mattresses.

 

This is a very well done presentation and easy to watch

http://www.slideshare.net/metametrix/environmental-toxicity-and-the-effect-on-health

 

Respiratory Toxicity of Mattress Emissions in Mice

SOURCE: Archives of Environmental Health, 55(1):38-43, 2000

“Groups of male Swiss-Webster mice breathed emissions of several brands of crib mattresses for two 1-hr periods. The authors used a computerized version of ASTM-E-981 test method to monitor respiratory frequncy, pattern, and airflow velocity and to diagnose abnormalities when statistically significant changes appeared. The emissions of four mattresses caused various combinations of upper-airways irritation (i.e., sensory irritation, lower-airways irritation (pulmonary irritation), and decreases in mid-expiratory airflow velocity. At the peak effect, a traditional mattress (wire springs with fiber padding) caused sensory irritation in 57% of breaths, pulmonary irritation in 23% of breaths, and airflow decrease in 11% of breaths. All mattresses caused pulmonary irritation, as shown by 17-23% of breaths at peak. The largest airflow decrease (i.e., affecting 26% of the breaths occurred with a polyurethane foam pad covered with vinyl. Sham exposures produced less than 6% sensory irritation, pulmonary irritation, or airflow limitation. Organic cotton padding caused very different effects, evidenced by increases in both respiratory rate and tidal volume. The authors used gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify respiratory irritants (e.g. styrene, isopropylbenzene, limonene) in the emissions of one of the polyurethane foam mattresses. Some mattresses emitted mixtures of volatile chemicals that had the potential to cause respiratory-tract irritation and decrease airflow velocity in mice.

Kapok (Ceiba pentandra) is a tropical tree of the order Malvales and the family Malvaceae (previously separated in the family Bombacaceae), native to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, northern South America, and (as the variety C. pentandra var. guineensis) to tropical west Africa. The word is also used for the fibre obtained from its seed pods. The tree is also known as the Java cotton, Java kapok, or ceiba. It is a sacred symbol in Maya mythology.

The tree grows to 60-70 m (200-230 ft) tall and has a very substantial trunk up to 3 m (10 ft) in diameter with buttresses. The trunk and many of the larger branches are densely crowded with very large, robust simple thorns. The leaves are compound of 5 to 9 leaflets, each up to 20 cm (8 in) and palm like. Adult trees produce several hundred 15 cm (6 in) seed pods. The pods contain seeds surrounded by a fluffy, yellowish fiber that is a mix of lignin and cellulose.

We have completely eliminated COTTON BATTING from our cushions. Cotton batting is one of the most chemically laden crops. 25% of all pesticides used in the world are on the cotton crop alone. Since the advent of synthetic fibers, kapok has virtually been eliminated as a mattress stuffing material, although this was traditionally the practice in Asia. For more info on the damaging effects of cotton, scroll down.

 

Conventional Cotton Statistics

Of all insecticides used globally each year, the estimated amount used on traditional cotton: 25%.

 

Five of the top nine pesticides used on cotton in the U.S. (cyanide, dicofol, naled, propargite, and trifluralin) are KNOWN cancer-causing chemicals. All nine are classified by the U.S. EPA as Category I and II— the most dangerous chemicals.

In the U.S. today, it takes approximately 8-10 years, and $100 million to develop a new pesticide for use on cotton. It takes approximately 5-6 years for weevils and other pests to develop an immunity to a new pesticide.

 

600,408 tons of herbicides, insecticides, fertilizers, fungicides, and other chemicals were used to produce cotton in 1992 in the 6 largest cotton producing states. (Agricultural Chemical Usage, 1992 Field Crops Summary, USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service)

 

Number of pesticides presently on the market that were registered before being tested to determine if they caused cancer, birth defects or wildlife toxicity: 400. (US EPA Pesticide Registration Progress Report, 1/93)

 

Amount of time it takes to ban a pesticide in the U.S. using present procedures: 10 years. (US EPA Pesticide Registration Progress Report, 1/93)

 

Number of active ingredients in pesticides found to cause cancer in animals or humans: 107.(After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

 

Of those active ingredients, the number still in use today: 83.(After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

 

Number of pesticides that are reproductive toxins according to the California E.P.A.: 15. (After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

 

Most acutely toxic pesticide registered by the E.P.A.: aldicarb (frequently used on cotton). (After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

 

Number of states in which aldicarb has been detected in the groundwater: 16. (After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

 

Percentage of all U.S. counties containing groundwater susceptible to contamination from agricultural pesticides and fertilizers: 46%. (After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

 

The Sustainable Cotton Project estimates that the average acre of California cotton grown in 1995 received some 300 pounds of synthetic fertilizers or 1/3 pound of fertilizer to raise every pound of cotton. Synthetic fertilizers have been found to contaminate drinking wells in farm communities and pose other long-term threats to farm land.

 

One of the commonly used pesticides on cotton throughout the world, endosulfan, leached from cotton fields into a creek in Lawrence County, Alabama during heavy rains in 1995. Within days 245,000 fish were killed over 16 mile stretch. 142,000 pounds of endosulfan were used in California in 1994.

 

In California’s San Joaquin Valley, estimates are that less than 25% of a pesticide sprayed from a crop duster ever hits the crop. The remainder can drift for several miles, coming to rest on fruit and vegetable crops, and farm- workers. One year more than one hundred workers fell ill after a single incident of such drift onto an adjacent vineyard.

 

In California, it has become illegal to feed the leaves, stems, and short fibers of cotton known as ‘gin trash’ to livestock, because of the concentrated levels of pesticide residue. Instead, this gin trash is used to make furniture, mattresses, tampons, swabs, and cotton balls. The average American woman will use 11,000 tampons or sanitary pads during her lifetime.

 

The problems with clothing production don’t stop in the field. During the conversion of conventional cotton into clothing, numerous toxic chemicals are added at each stage— silicone waxes, harsh petroleum scours, softeners, heavy metals, flame and soil retardants, ammonia, and formaldehyde— to name just a few.

 

The search for nontoxic cotton –

includes related article on minimizing textile toxicity

The process of manufacturing cotton clothing often includes the use of chemicals that can affect not only the environment, but the consumer as well.

Nylon, the first manufactured fiber to be sold commercially, made its debut in the form of stockings at the 1939 World’s Fair. Now, 53 years later, manufactured fibers–most notably, polyester, acrylic, and nylon–account for well over half of all textile fibers purchased in the United States.

Before the introduction of synthetics, people all over the world had dressed in, slept under, and eaten off of textiles made from natural fibers –primarily cotton, wool, silk, and linen. Globally, cotton remains the most utilized fiber. And despite the relatively recent popularity of synthetic-fiber textiles, which are actually plastics derived from petrochemicals, United States consumers desiring purity in a natural fiber continue to seek out cotton.

How Pure Is “100% Pure”?

Conventional cotton cultivation and manufacturing are very unnatural processes. Conventionally grown cotton sprouts from seeds that are routinely treated with one or more fungicides to forestall seedling rotting; at planting time, additional fungicides are often applied to the soil. To control weeds, cotton farmers use preemergent herbicides at or before planting time, and postemergent herbicides while the plants are growing. Crop dusters spray chemical defoliants on cotton fields prior to harvest so that the leaves will not stain the white fibers during the mechanical picking process. If a second growth appears before the harvest, farmers use chemical dessicants to kill the plants. Some cotton farmers spray their crops with chemical insecticides as a matter of course; others use pesticides only when insects multiply into numbers they consider dangerous.

All over the world, cotton is one of the crops most heavily treated by chemicals. And whereas many of the “heavy” pesticides–such as DDT –have been banned in the United States, they are still used in other countries, and they are used on cotton crops. Other pesticides used in cotton growing both here and abroad are also considered highly toxic. Moreover, as pests become resistant to these chemicals, greater quantities and more powerful varieties are used.

Cotton-growing practices in Third World countries have been implicated in ecological destruction as well as unjust treatment of laborers. Furthermore, conventional cotton farming worldwide, aside from using huge amounts of chemicals, requires vast quantities of fossil fuels to produce the chemicals and, particularly in the United States, consumes vast amounts of topsoil and water in irrigating the fields.

If all this isn’t enough to make you sweat and squirm in your 100 percent cotton duds, consider what happens to cotton after it’s picked and ginned to remove the seeds: the fiber is washed in various detergents, bleached, dyed, then treated with any number of chemicals, including those used in lye baths, sizing, and formaldehyde finishes.

What Are the Dangers of Wearing Cotton?

“I have no reason to believe that there’s any direct danger from pesticide residue to the consumer who buys and wears cotton,” says Debra Lynn Dadd, author of Nontoxic, Natural & Earthwise. “However, I am concerned about the effect of pesticides on the environment. I am also concerned about the effects–on both consumers and the environment–of some of the chemicals used in manufacturing and processing cotton.”

Environmentally, chemical fertilizers and pesticides have great staying power and an unnerving tendency to travel long distances–at times showing up far from the origin of spraying. Pesticide residues have been found in coral reefs around the world, as a result of runoff into water systems. And drift (a process whereby chemicals, particularly those that are sprayed, travel by air) often causes pesticide residues to land on organically grown fruits and vegetables. “Unfortunately, because of drift, organic does not necessarily mean pesticide-free,” says Brian Baker, technical director of California Certified Organic Farmers in Santa Cruz, California.

Pesticides can affect human members of the ecosystem as well. Cotton farmers and their families–indeed, anyone living near a community where cotton is grown conventionally–experience concentrated exposure to all the chemicals used before and during the growing process. “Absences from school due to sickness and general reports of ill health go way up during cotton defoliation season in California’s San Joaquin Valley,” notes Baker.

Similarly, chemicals used in processing and manufacturing cotton can have determental effects on the environment. As the by-products of these procedures pass into the effluent, their chemical content, temperature, and pH can disrupt the ecosystems into which they flow. One particularly problematic example is the by-product dioxin, which results from the use of chlorine in the bleaching of cotton fibers. In response to this problem, many manufacturers have switched to hydrogen peroxide as a bleaching agent. The by-products of hydrogen peroxide bleaching–specifically, hydrogen and oxygen–are less toxic than dioxin; however, possible problems associated with temperature changes and altered pH, and the unknown impact of introducing anything foreign into a given ecosystem, have convinced some environmentally conscious producers of cotton clothing to abandon the bleaching process altogether.

 

All round insecticides with many side effects

Endosulfan was used as an active ingredient in many pesticides as early as 1956. It has a wide range of use as an insecticide and plays an especially important role in cotton cultivation, as cotton in conventional production is particularly susceptible to pests and disease. In particular, endosulfan is used against one of the main cotton pests, the boll weevil Helicoverpa armigera.

Endosulfan is introduced to the environment via many retail products, (Thiodan being the most well-known worldwide), which are used on farms and cultivation areas. Apart from the previously mentioned use in cotton cultivation, the active ingredient is also used on tea and coffee plantations or in vegetable cultivation, as well as in fruit growing and in forestry. It is also used as a wood preservative.

Due to its broad-band effectiveness against insects and mites it is universally used as a form of contact poison or stomach insecticide. In addition, as its patent has now run out it is cheaply available on the market.

Therefore, as it is less expensive endosulfan is still used, especially in poorer countries.

As endosulfan is not aimed at a particular type of insect, other non-target organisms are also endangered. However, endosulfan is mainly associated with the many cases of poisoning which occur every year, mainly in developing countries.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has classified endosulfan as moderately dangerous due to its poisonous effects (Danger Class II); the American Environmental Agency EPA classifies endosulfan as highly dangerous.

PAN Asia and PAN Africa have long been campaigning for a worldwide ban on endosulfan due to frequent cases of poisoning. The substance is too dangerous for people in developing countries who are frequently illiterate and often do not have protective clothing.

Variety of poisoning possibilities

Pesticides do not only enter the body by using them directly. Many cases of poisoning occur due to contaminated drinking water and food which contains residues of endosulfan. Even smoke from a cigarette, the tobacco of which contains residues of endosulfan, can lead to poisoning as can contact with contaminated ground.

Realities in developing countries ignored

Pesticide manufacturers recommend the use of gloves, glasses, long clothing and a breathing mask when handling pesticides. However, in developing countries reality is sometimes very different. Under conditions of poverty, pesticides are usually handled without any protective clothing whatsoever. The climatic conditions also make the wearing of protective clothing in high temperatures a torment. Recommendations given by manufacturers are not suited to the conditions in tropical countries and are therefore unrealistic for many of the countries affected. Moreover, many of the users who only speak the local language are usually not able to understand the handling instructions, which are usually written in a European language, or they cannot read them at all.

International responsibility

According to a study by the Fraunhofer Institute in 2002, between 10,000 and 50,000 tons of endosulfan are produced each year in the EU. In the year 2003, in Germany alone, between 250 and 1,000 tons of endosulfan were exported. European and German concerns must therefore also take responsibility for poisonings in Southern countries

What happens in the body?

The exact mechanism of endosulfan in the body has not been completely researched. However, various studies have shown it to be extremely toxic and that it has a direct effect on the central nervous system. Many investigations prove that Endosulfan has a damaging effect on the skin, as well as on the mucus membranes of the breathing tract and the eyes. Additional symptoms of poisoning in humans are vomiting, diarrhoea, headaches, dizziness and restlessness which can increase and lead to disorientation and end in cramping attacks. As well as hyperactivity and twitching, symptoms such as breathing difficulties, lack of coordination in movement and lack of balance were observed. For those with a low protein diet, the effects of endosulfan are even more drastic. This is especially the case in many of the poorer countries where many people have to deal with the problem of malnutrition and undernourishment.

Although acute poisoning is the main problem, there are also possibilities of chronic effects on people who were exposed to small doses of endosulfan over a long period of time. Animal studies show that it affects the liver and kidney, as well as unborn foetuses. The animals examined also showed lack of resistance to disease.

Small amounts with great effects

The WHO, in cooperation with the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations), lays down the ADI values (Acceptable Daily Intake) for dangerous substances. The ADIs define the maximum amount of a substance which a person could consume on a daily basis during the whole of their life, without it resulting in any damage to their health. For endosulfan the value is 0.006 mg/kg body weight. An adult weighing 65 kg could therefore consume 0.36 mg of endosulfan a day without endangering themselves. Such a dose, taken over a period of 50 years, would result in the low risk amount of 7.12 g. This is the equivalent of two lumps of sugar. An unbelievably small amount in comparison to the production figures of the active ingredient.

Endosulfan also has an immense effect on the environment. Just small concentrations of endosulfan in water can cause lasting damage to plant and animal life.

Bans and new approvals

Endosulfan is no longer approved as a pesticide due to its toxicity in only four countries worldwide. It is completely banned in Sri Lanka, Norway, Belize and the Netherlands. Another four countries have limited its use. This is also the case in the German Federal Republic. The registration of the active ingredient ran out in West Germany on 26.11.1991, and in the newly-formed German states it didn’t run out until 1994 because of an interim arrangement. At present, a revision of older pesticides is being carried out at EU level within the framework of the pesticides authorization Directive 91/414. Endosulfan is already undergoing the reviewing process.

While some countries are trying to get endosulfan banned and others have already succeeded, in other parts of the world it is still used. In some West African countries it was re-approved for the Endosulfan Pestizid Aktions-Netzwerk e.V. (PAN Germany) 1999/2000 season and marketed by Aventis, whose agricultural branch has since been taken over by Bayer. Previous to this, the cotton crop had seriously declined as some pests had developed resistance to other pesticide active ingredients. In Senegal, the crop yield fell from 50,576 tons in the 1991/1992 season to 11,623 tons in the years 1998/1999. In the 2000/2001 season altogether 29,331 litres of Endosulfan were sprayed. The re-utilization of endosulfan led to many deaths. OBEPAB (Organisation Béninoise pour la Promotion de l’Agriculture Biologique) registered 37 deaths in the Borgou area in Benin during the 1999/2000 season. Another 36 people suffered serious poisoning. The total number of pesticide accidents was probably much higher. These examples illustrate just how hazardous endosulfan is.

Endosulfan in West Africa

In January 2001 until July 2003, PAN UK investigated the effects of various pesticide products on humans, in cooperation with PAN Africa, OBEPAB and some smaller African NGOs. This study was carried out in Benin, Mali and in Cameroon. In all three countries most of the pesticides used contained endosulfan. Blood probes were taken from farmers and tested for traces of endosulfan. In the Koutiala region in Mali a total of 28 cases of poisoning were reported. In Fana, Mali, 78 farmers from six villages were questioned. Here there were 19 poisonings. Most of those poisoned were illiterate adults, of whom only a few allowed themselves to be treated in hospital.

http://www.eyekonic.co.uk/food-for-thought.htm

Materials

Materials

Our Materials

 

Carolina Morning Designs is a pioneer in the Organic Furniture movement. We have searched out the most eco-friendly materials we can find and always strive to improve in this area. We invent things you can use to replace the everyday toxic objects we have in our homes and work places.

Our products are made from meticulously sourced organic, eco-friendly, and/or recycled materials including Organic Cotton (with the option of conventional cotton for some products), Eco Wool®, kapok fiber, buckwheat hulls, beeswax, and flax seed. We use 100% recycled wood non-toxic Medex® for our benches and EcoBackrests™, and sustainably harvested poplar wood for our EcoSquares™. All of our wood products are finished with a whey-based non-toxic wood finish. We buy domestically produced and local/regional as often as possible.

Below is a discussion of each material and the facts around it.

 BUCKWHEAT HULLS

Buckwheat is grown without herbicides and pesticides because this crop is not bothered by pests. Buckwheat is able to grow in poor soil without a problem. Buckwheat actually enhances the soil where it grows.

Our chemical-free buckwheat hulls are sustainably grown as a combination “green manure” or cover crop, and a crop producing Kashi – a roasted buckwheat cereal. There are two main milling processes for buckwheat that produce very different hulls. With the ROASTING process, dust is burned off instead of using water, and makes a clean, sturdy hull that smells like, well, roasted buckwheat. The other buckwheat milling process is to mill the hull WITHOUT ROASTING it first. This produces an inferior hull which requires washing to remove dust. The ROASTING method, in our experience, produces a better, longer lasting hull. However, there are no ROASTED hulls which are certified organic. We have chosen the ROASTED hulls because we feel the certification process is minor in this case, since this buckwheat is grown totally without pesticides, herbicides or other chemicals. Click here for research on the buckwheat growing process.

KAPOK

Kapok is soft, smooth, hygienic, non-toxic, hypoallergenic and environmentally friendly. It is breathable, allows air circulation and has healthful benefits. It can be reused for generations, without developing mold or decaying. It even floats!

Kapok is one of the few sustainable rainforest crops. It is grown without herbicides and pesticides because this crop is not bothered by pests. Kapok actually enhances the soil and ecosystem where it grows.

Kapok fiber comes from the seed pod of the majestic kapok tree. Kapok, an ancient treasure, has for centuries, represented a prized possession and historically used by gurus, saints and spiritual masters who marveled at its unique characteristics such as its ability to shape to the body with rebounding instantly to its original fluffy shape.

Kapok (Ceiba pentandra) is a tropical tree of the order Malvales and the family Malvaceae (previously separated in the family Bombacaceae), native to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, northern South America, and (as the variety C. pentandra var. guineensis) to tropical west Africa. The word is also used for the fibre obtained from its seed pods. The tree is also known as the Java cotton, Java kapok, or ceiba. It is a sacred symbol in Maya mythology.

The tree grows to 60-70 m (200-230 ft) tall and has a very substantial trunk up to 3 m (10 ft) in diameter with buttresses. The trunk and many of the larger branches are densely crowded with very large, robust simple thorns. The leaves are compound of 5 to 9 leaflets, each up to 20 cm (8 in) and palm like. Adult trees produce several hundred 15 cm (6 in) seed pods. The pods contain seeds surrounded by a fluffy, yellowish fiber that is a mix of lignin and cellulose.

We have completely eliminated COTTON BATTING from our cushions and replaced it with kapok. Since we live in the south we noticed cotton batting has a tendency to mold from simple humidity in the air. Cotton is also one of the most chemically laden crops. 25% of all pesticides used in the world are on the cotton crop alone. Kapok has been used for centuries as stuffing material for sleeping and sitting mats and mattresses. Since the advent of synthetic fibers, kapok has virtually been eliminated as a mattress stuffing material.

POPLAR WOOD

Eco Squares™ and railings are made from sustainably harvested poplar wood grown and milled in our own Appalachian Mountains.

MEDEX

Tilt Seats™, Peace Benches™, Sky Benches™, and Eco Backrest™ frames are all made from Medex, which is an eco-friendly Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF). This material is non-toxic and Forest Stewardship Council Certified, with no added formaldehyde. To that we add a non-toxic, whey-based finish called Vermont Natural Coatings Furniture Finish. We also mix in some special ingredients to further the health and well being effects: EM™ Ceramic Powder and Amethyst Gemstone Powder. These rock dusts are embedded in the finish and provide several benefits through their healing frequencies. These benefits include: relaxation on a cellular and vibrational level, discharging static electricity from the body, mitigating some of the effects of electrosmog pollution, and balancing the energy of the chakras.

Medex™ represents the highly versatile ideal of SierraPine Sustainable Design Fiberboard (SDF)*. Medex™ is a powerful combination of moisture resistance, superior MDF board properties, and a formaldehyde free adhesive system. Medex™ has a rock solid track record of superior design capabilities and environmental stewardship around the world.Click here for more info.

ECO WOOL

Eco Wool is used in our futons as the ‘barrier’ layer. That means it is surrounding the outer boundaries of the futon and is itself encased in an organic cotton fabic. Eco Wool Felt Barrier Cloth adds a nice resiliency or spring to the futon and at the same time protects the futon from becoming a fire hazard.

The name “Eco Wool” is the signature product of Woolgatherers Carding Mill.

Eco Wool® batting is made from a blend of wool from different sheep breeds selected by Woolgatherer Carding Mill. Each wool grower must ensure that fleeces come from healthy sheep raised on sustainably managed lands. They  pay collaborating wool growers a premium for the best fleeces from their flocks. Fleeces are then cleaned and carded on a full wool card line, which produces the finest known woolen batting available.

Our growers ensure:

PROPER GRAZING METHODS: Adequate field rotation to decrease soil erosion and to reduce the risk of sheep acquiring internal parasites.

PREDATOR FRIENDLY: Growers are encouraged to use trained sheep guardian dogs (not trapping or shooting) and the inclusion of other larger animals, such as llamas, to guard the flock.

HEALTHY VETERINARY PRACTICES: Only certain kinds of medications and supplements can be used to treat the sheep. Alternative caring methods are preferred to keep sheep healthy with fewer chemicals.

CHEMICAL CONTROL: Eco Wool opposes the use of herbicides and pesticides on fields that the sheep will be grazing in. We are able to determine if growers use these chemicals in our routine wool chemical testing.

SPECIFICATIONS FOR BREED, COLOR, STRENGTH AND MICRON-WIDTH: The Woolgatherer Carding Mill blend uses wool from six to eight different breeds, depending on availability. Eco Wool does not allow black wool and very little canary yellow wool in the ECO WOOL blend.

SKIRTING: Skirting is the process of removing less-desirable wool from the belly and back end of the sheep. This wool is separated on a skirting table and sold to other clients. In addition samples of wool are sent to two separate laboratories for chemical testing. A sample of the raw wool is sent to the University of Utah, and a sample of the batting is sent to Oeko-Tech Laboratory in Germany. The University of Mass-Lowell performed tests comparing Eco Wool batting to a competitorÕs for strength, resilience, flammability, and endurance. Their tests demonstrated that a mattress made with ECO WOOL batting would last twice as long as the competitor’s before flattening on top.

Common Wool Industry Practices That the Woolgatherer Carding Mill Opposes:

CARBONIZING: Destroying vegetable matter lodged in wool using harsh acid; leaving the wool dried and unnaturally crimped. This method is used with New Zealand wool, as it tends to contain more veggie matter (5%VM). DIPPING: Bathing sheep in chemicals to ward off pests and insects.

BLEACHING: Different chemical solutions can be applied to whiten wool during and after scouring.

CARELESS SHEARING: Shearers are often paid per sheep, encouraging the average shearer to hurry. This leads to small wounds on the sheep that can easily become infected.

OVER-GRAZING: Crowding too many sheep onto land destroys vegetation and leads to erosion. If a field becomes barren, the grower must bring in dry feed that can add additional veggie-matter to the fleece.

Textile Facts: Buckwheat Hulls, Kapok, Cotton, vs. Synthetics

Textile Facts: Buckwheat Hulls, Kapok, Cotton, vs. Synthetics

SPECIFICATIONS FOR BREED, COLOR, STRENGTH AND MICRON-WIDTH: The Woolgatherer Carding Mill blend uses wool from six to eight different breeds, depending on availability. Eco Wool does not allow black wool and very little canary yellow wool in the ECO WOOL blend.

SKIRTING: Skirting is the process of removing less-desirable wool from the belly and back end of the sheep. This wool is separated on a skirting table and sold to other clients. In addition samples of wool are sent to two separate laboratories for chemical testing. A sample of the raw wool is sent to the University of Utah, and a sample of the batting is sent to Oeko-Tech Laboratory in Germany. The University of Mass-Lowell performed tests comparing Eco Wool batting to a competitorÕs for strength, resilience, flammability, and endurance. Their tests demonstrated that a mattress made with ECO WOOL batting would last twice as long as the competitor’s before flattening on top.
What Follows are some notes on the ecological and health impacts of the textile industry (natural materials vs. synthetic)

Common Wool Industry Practices:

CARBONIZING: Destroying vegetable matter lodged in wool using harsh acid; leaving the wool dried and unnaturally crimped. This method is used with New Zealand wool, as it tends to contain more veggie matter (5%VM). DIPPING: Bathing sheep in chemicals to ward off pests and insects.

BLEACHING: Different chemical solutions can be applied to whiten wool during and after scouring.

CARELESS SHEARING: Shearers are often paid per sheep, encouraging the average shearer to hurry. This leads to small wounds on the sheep that can easily become infected.

OVER-GRAZING: Crowding too many sheep onto land destroys vegetation and leads to erosion. If a field becomes barren, the grower must bring in dry feed that can add additional veggie-matter to the fleece. R

Conventional Cotton Statistics

Of all insecticides used globally each year, the estimated amount used on traditional cotton: 25%.

Five of the top nine pesticides used on cotton in the U.S. (cyanide, dicofol, naled, propargite, and trifluralin) are KNOWN cancer-causing chemicals. All nine are classified by the U.S. EPA as Category I and II— the most dangerous chemicals.

In the U.S. today, it takes approximately 8-10 years, and $100 million to develop a new pesticide for use on cotton. It takes approximately 5-6 years for weevils and other pests to develop an immunity to a new pesticide.

600,408 tons of herbicides, insecticides, fertilizers, fungicides, and other chemicals were used to produce cotton in 1992 in the 6 largest cotton producing states. (Agricultural Chemical Usage, 1992 Field Crops Summary, USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service)

Number of pesticides presently on the market that were registered before being tested to determine if they caused cancer, birth defects or wildlife toxicity: 400. (US EPA Pesticide Registration Progress Report, 1/93)

Amount of time it takes to ban a pesticide in the U.S. using present procedures: 10 years. (US EPA Pesticide Registration Progress Report, 1/93)

Number of active ingredients in pesticides found to cause cancer in animals or humans: 107.(After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

Of those active ingredients, the number still in use today: 83.(After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

Number of pesticides that are reproductive toxins according to the California E.P.A.: 15. (After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

Most acutely toxic pesticide registered by the E.P.A.: aldicarb (frequently used on cotton). (After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

Number of states in which aldicarb has been detected in the groundwater: 16. (After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

Percentage of all U.S. counties containing groundwater susceptible to contamination from agricultural pesticides and fertilizers: 46%. (After Silent Spring, NRDC, 6/93)

The Sustainable Cotton Project estimates that the average acre of California cotton grown in 1995 received some 300 pounds of synthetic fertilizers or 1/3 pound of fertilizer to raise every pound of cotton. Synthetic fertilizers have been found to contaminate drinking wells in farm communities and pose other long-term threats to farm land.

One of the commonly used pesticides on cotton throughout the world, endosulfan, leached from cotton fields into a creek in Lawrence County, Alabama during heavy rains in 1995. Within days 245,000 fish were killed over 16 mile stretch. 142,000 pounds of endosulfan were used in California in 1994.

In California’s San Joaquin Valley, estimates are that less than 25% of a pesticide sprayed from a crop duster ever hits the crop. The remainder can drift for several miles, coming to rest on fruit and vegetable crops, and farm- workers. One year more than one hundred workers fell ill after a single incident of such drift onto an adjacent vineyard.

In California, it has become illegal to feed the leaves, stems, and short fibers of cotton known as ‘gin trash’ to livestock, because of the concentrated levels of pesticide residue. Instead, this gin trash is used to make furniture, mattresses, tampons, swabs, and cotton balls. The average American woman will use 11,000 tampons or sanitary pads during her lifetime.

The problems with clothing production don’t stop in the field. During the conversion of conventional cotton into clothing, numerous toxic chemicals are added at each stage— silicone waxes, harsh petroleum scours, softeners, heavy metals, flame and soil retardants, ammonia, and formaldehyde— to name just a few.

The search for nontoxic cotton –

includes related article on minimizing textile toxicity

The process of manufacturing cotton clothing often includes the use of chemicals that can affect not only the environment, but the consumer as well.

Nylon, the first manufactured fiber to be sold commercially, made its debut in the form of stockings at the 1939 World’s Fair. Now, 53 years later, manufactured fibers–most notably, polyester, acrylic, and nylon–account for well over half of all textile fibers purchased in the United States.

Before the introduction of synthetics, people all over the world had dressed in, slept under, and eaten off of textiles made from natural fibers –primarily cotton, wool, silk, and linen. Globally, cotton remains the most utilized fiber. And despite the relatively recent popularity of synthetic-fiber textiles, which are actually plastics derived from petrochemicals, United States consumers desiring purity in a natural fiber continue to seek out cotton.

How Pure Is “100% Pure”?

Conventional cotton cultivation and manufacturing are very unnatural processes. Conventionally grown cotton sprouts from seeds that are routinely treated with one or more fungicides to forestall seedling rotting; at planting time, additional fungicides are often applied to the soil. To control weeds, cotton farmers use preemergent herbicides at or before planting time, and postemergent herbicides while the plants are growing. Crop dusters spray chemical defoliants on cotton fields prior to harvest so that the leaves will not stain the white fibers during the mechanical picking process. If a second growth appears before the harvest, farmers use chemical dessicants to kill the plants. Some cotton farmers spray their crops with chemical insecticides as a matter of course; others use pesticides only when insects multiply into numbers they consider dangerous.

All over the world, cotton is one of the crops most heavily treated by chemicals. And whereas many of the “heavy” pesticides–such as DDT –have been banned in the United States, they are still used in other countries, and they are used on cotton crops. Other pesticides used in cotton growing both here and abroad are also considered highly toxic. Moreover, as pests become resistant to these chemicals, greater quantities and more powerful varieties are used.

Cotton-growing practices in Third World countries have been implicated in ecological destruction as well as unjust treatment of laborers. Furthermore, conventional cotton farming worldwide, aside from using huge amounts of chemicals, requires vast quantities of fossil fuels to produce the chemicals and, particularly in the United States, consumes vast amounts of topsoil and water in irrigating the fields.

If all this isn’t enough to make you sweat and squirm in your 100 percent cotton duds, consider what happens to cotton after it’s picked and ginned to remove the seeds: the fiber is washed in various detergents, bleached, dyed, then treated with any number of chemicals, including those used in lye baths, sizing, and formaldehyde finishes.

What Are the Dangers of Wearing Cotton?

“I have no reason to believe that there’s any direct danger from pesticide residue to the consumer who buys and wears cotton,” says Debra Lynn Dadd, author of Nontoxic, Natural & Earthwise. “However, I am concerned about the effect of pesticides on the environment. I am also concerned about the effects–on both consumers and the environment–of some of the chemicals used in manufacturing and processing cotton.”

Environmentally, chemical fertilizers and pesticides have great staying power and an unnerving tendency to travel long distances–at times showing up far from the origin of spraying. Pesticide residues have been found in coral reefs around the world, as a result of runoff into water systems. And drift (a process whereby chemicals, particularly those that are sprayed, travel by air) often causes pesticide residues to land on organically grown fruits and vegetables. “Unfortunately, because of drift, organic does not necessarily mean pesticide-free,” says Brian Baker, technical director of California Certified Organic Farmers in Santa Cruz, California.

Pesticides can affect human members of the ecosystem as well. Cotton farmers and their families–indeed, anyone living near a community where cotton is grown conventionally–experience concentrated exposure to all the chemicals used before and during the growing process. “Absences from school due to sickness and general reports of ill health go way up during cotton defoliation season in California’s San Joaquin Valley,” notes Baker.

Similarly, chemicals used in processing and manufacturing cotton can have determental effects on the environment. As the by-products of these procedures pass into the effluent, their chemical content, temperature, and pH can disrupt the ecosystems into which they flow. One particularly problematic example is the by-product dioxin, which results from the use of chlorine in the bleaching of cotton fibers. In response to this problem, many manufacturers have switched to hydrogen peroxide as a bleaching agent. The by-products of hydrogen peroxide bleaching–specifically, hydrogen and oxygen–are less toxic than dioxin; however, possible problems associated with temperature changes and altered pH, and the unknown impact of introducing anything foreign into a given ecosystem, have convinced some environmentally conscious producers of cotton clothing to abandon the bleaching process altogether.

All round insecticides with many side effects

Endosulfan was used as an active ingredient in many pesticides as early as 1956. It has a wide range of use as an insecticide and plays an especially important role in cotton cultivation, as cotton in conventional production is particularly susceptible to pests and disease. In particular, endosulfan is used against one of the main cotton pests, the boll weevil Helicoverpa armigera.

Endosulfan is introduced to the environment via many retail products, (Thiodan being the most well-known worldwide), which are used on farms and cultivation areas. Apart from the previously mentioned use in cotton cultivation, the active ingredient is also used on tea and coffee plantations or in vegetable cultivation, as well as in fruit growing and in forestry. It is also used as a wood preservative.

Due to its broad-band effectiveness against insects and mites it is universally used as a form of contact poison or stomach insecticide. In addition, as its patent has now run out it is cheaply available on the market.

Therefore, as it is less expensive endosulfan is still used, especially in poorer countries.

As endosulfan is not aimed at a particular type of insect, other non-target organisms are also endangered. However, endosulfan is mainly associated with the many cases of poisoning which occur every year, mainly in developing countries.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has classified endosulfan as moderately dangerous due to its poisonous effects (Danger Class II); the American Environmental Agency EPA classifies endosulfan as highly dangerous.

PAN Asia and PAN Africa have long been campaigning for a worldwide ban on endosulfan due to frequent cases of poisoning. The substance is too dangerous for people in developing countries who are frequently illiterate and often do not have protective clothing.

Variety of poisoning possibilities

Pesticides do not only enter the body by using them directly. Many cases of poisoning occur due to contaminated drinking water and food which contains residues of endosulfan. Even smoke from a cigarette, the tobacco of which contains residues of endosulfan, can lead to poisoning as can contact with contaminated ground.

Realities in developing countries ignored

Pesticide manufacturers recommend the use of gloves, glasses, long clothing and a breathing mask when handling pesticides. However, in developing countries reality is sometimes very different. Under conditions of poverty, pesticides are usually handled without any protective clothing whatsoever. The climatic conditions also make the wearing of protective clothing in high temperatures a torment. Recommendations given by manufacturers are not suited to the conditions in tropical countries and are therefore unrealistic for many of the countries affected. Moreover, many of the users who only speak the local language are usually not able to understand the handling instructions, which are usually written in a European language, or they cannot read them at all.

International responsibility

According to a study by the Fraunhofer Institute in 2002, between 10,000 and 50,000 tons of endosulfan are produced each year in the EU. In the year 2003, in Germany alone, between 250 and 1,000 tons of endosulfan were exported. European and German concerns must therefore also take responsibility for poisonings in Southern countries

What happens in the body?

The exact mechanism of endosulfan in the body has not been completely researched. However, various studies have shown it to be extremely toxic and that it has a direct effect on the central nervous system. Many investigations prove that Endosulfan has a damaging effect on the skin, as well as on the mucus membranes of the breathing tract and the eyes. Additional symptoms of poisoning in humans are vomiting, diarrhoea, headaches, dizziness and restlessness which can increase and lead to disorientation and end in cramping attacks. As well as hyperactivity and twitching, symptoms such as breathing difficulties, lack of coordination in movement and lack of balance were observed. For those with a low protein diet, the effects of endosulfan are even more drastic. This is especially the case in many of the poorer countries where many people have to deal with the problem of malnutrition and undernourishment.

Although acute poisoning is the main problem, there are also possibilities of chronic effects on people who were exposed to small doses of endosulfan over a long period of time. Animal studies show that it affects the liver and kidney, as well as unborn foetuses. The animals examined also showed lack of resistance to disease.

Small amounts with great effects

The WHO, in cooperation with the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations), lays down the ADI values (Acceptable Daily Intake) for dangerous substances. The ADIs define the maximum amount of a substance which a person could consume on a daily basis during the whole of their life, without it resulting in any damage to their health. For endosulfan the value is 0.006 mg/kg body weight. An adult weighing 65 kg could therefore consume 0.36 mg of endosulfan a day without endangering themselves. Such a dose, taken over a period of 50 years, would result in the low risk amount of 7.12 g. This is the equivalent of two lumps of sugar. An unbelievably small amount in comparison to the production figures of the active ingredient.

Endosulfan also has an immense effect on the environment. Just small concentrations of endosulfan in water can cause lasting damage to plant and animal life.

Bans and new approvals

Endosulfan is no longer approved as a pesticide due to its toxicity in only four countries worldwide. It is completely banned in Sri Lanka, Norway, Belize and the Netherlands. Another four countries have limited its use. This is also the case in the German Federal Republic. The registration of the active ingredient ran out in West Germany on 26.11.1991, and in the newly-formed German states it didn’t run out until 1994 because of an interim arrangement. At present, a revision of older pesticides is being carried out at EU level within the framework of the pesticides authorization Directive 91/414. Endosulfan is already undergoing the reviewing process.

While some countries are trying to get endosulfan banned and others have already succeeded, in other parts of the world it is still used. In some West African countries it was re-approved for the Endosulfan Pestizid Aktions-Netzwerk e.V. (PAN Germany) 1999/2000 season and marketed by Aventis, whose agricultural branch has since been taken over by Bayer. Previous to this, the cotton crop had seriously declined as some pests had developed resistance to other pesticide active ingredients. In Senegal, the crop yield fell from 50,576 tons in the 1991/1992 season to 11,623 tons in the years 1998/1999. In the 2000/2001 season altogether 29,331 litres of Endosulfan were sprayed. The re-utilization of endosulfan led to many deaths. OBEPAB (Organisation Béninoise pour la Promotion de l’Agriculture Biologique) registered 37 deaths in the Borgou area in Benin during the 1999/2000 season. Another 36 people suffered serious poisoning. The total number of pesticide accidents was probably much higher. These examples illustrate just how hazardous endosulfan is.

Endosulfan in West Africa

In January 2001 until July 2003, PAN UK investigated the effects of various pesticide products on humans, in cooperation with PAN Africa, OBEPAB and some smaller African NGOs. This study was carried out in Benin, Mali and in Cameroon. In all three countries most of the pesticides used contained endosulfan. Blood probes were taken from farmers and tested for traces of endosulfan. In the Koutiala region in Mali a total of 28 cases of poisoning were reported. In Fana, Mali, 78 farmers from six villages were questioned. Here there were 19 poisonings. Most of those poisoned were illiterate adults, of whom only a few allowed themselves to be treated in hospital.

http://www.eyekonic.co.uk/food-for-thought.htm

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Buckwheat Hulls

1-5 pounds = $4 per pound10 pounds = $35 ($3.50/lb.)15 Pounds = $52.50

24 pound bag = $72.00 ($3.00/lb.)

2 or more bags = $60.00 each ($2.50/lb.)

Due to the high cost of shipping we can only ship buckwheat hulls to the lower 48 United States. Alaska and Hawaii residents: Call.

Kapok by the pound

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Kapok

5 pounds = $42.50 ($8.50 per pound)

10 pounds = $75.00 ($7.50 per pound)

20 pounds = $140.00 ($7.00 per pound)

40 pounds = $240 ($6.00 per pound)

Note: Due to the high cost of shipping we can only ship kapok to the lower 48 United States. Canada, Alaska and Hawaii: Call us.

Customer Testimonials

“I saw someone using a zafu at a retreat and I thought: Wow! this is the greatest thing anyone has invented since the wheel.” Soyun Kim (Passionist Lay Missioner)

 

I’ve been struggling with my meditation practice for a while due to hip pain. Now I know I just didn’t have the proper equipment. From the instant I sat on my lovely lavender cloud I felt comfortable and eager to practice. Thank you for making such beautiful, safe and comfortable products!

Sincerely, Rebecca Lanning.

 

Dear Friends at Carolina Morning Design,

Thank you for supporting City Dharma, a newly forming community here in Pittsburgh, PA .Here is a picture of our small yet committed group of Carnegie Mellon University staff and friends.  

With bows of gratitude,

Rev. Jisen

 

I just purchased your Smile Cushion from Dancing Moon in Raleigh, NC this afternoon and couldn’t be happier!!I have horrible low back pain and numbness going down through my legs and haven’t had any all evening!!

My husband and I are looking forward to purchasing more of your products as we begin to streamline our life and getting rid of the excess “stuff”.

Thank you for making such a wonderful product and for being an ethically green and sound company.

Molly Austin, Raleigh, NC

 

Testimonials

I love that I can fluff/redistribute the kapok as needed. I could never do that when my last mattress started to dip. My husband had been sleeping on the floor for a year before we bought the futons. We are now, happily sleeping together.

–Ebonie Moore, Chicago, IL

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I can’t imagine sleeping on anything else. I think it has to do with the natural materials and how they relate to my body. I love this bed so much!

Timothy Redmond, Charlotte, NC

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You’re products made it possible for my wife and I to move to a small apartment in style. Never slept so good in years–even on an expensive bed. You have obviously put much talent and time into developing deceptively simple concepts that allowed us to walk in and buy off the shelf all that we needed to downscale, simplify, and green our abode. Moving was a breeze! Thank you so much!

Jon Towers, Boone, NC

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FUTON

 

I had been plagued for many years with constant low-back pain. I take care of myself and try to stay healthy, so this constant pain was getting in my way. Every now and again, I would even get sciatica pains to add to it. It came time to get a new mattress, and I decided to do some research. I was thinking about a futon…and I started reading about Japanese-style. Long story short, I decided to get one from Carolina Morning, and I am so glad that I did. It has been the most comfortable sleep I have ever had. I no longer have chronic low-back pain…and that is just from changing over to sleeping on this mat on the floor! I have not been to a chiropractor or anyone else, the result came strictly from sleeping on this futon. I have been telling people about it ever since! 🙂 Thank you!

Heather Hollywood, PA

 

“We had imagined a platform like your modular futon and planned to build one until I found your web site. We assembled it last night and the packaging and craftsmanship of the product are awesome. We are so excited about the quality of your product we ordered the backrest and a zabuton today. Great work!”

Adam Khalfalla

Toronto, Ontario

 

In July I went to a 3 week intensive program at Shambhala Mountain Center in Colorado where they only have gomdens, high, firm rectangular cushions. Since I was packing for 3 weeks in a tent, I didn\’t have room for my zafu, so in desperation I ordered your inflatable zafu. It was fantastic. I used it all day every day. I didn\’t even have to add air to it. I was thrilled, and now I have a travel zafu for future use. Thank you so much!” – Judy, Dorchester MA

 

PEACE BENCH********************

stimonials:I just received my Peace Bench last night and used it this morning. It is amazing! Thanks so much. I have been meditating since 1993 and have graduated from a hard filled zafu, to buckwheat, to now a bench following a recent back injury (sciatica) that has made it difficult to sit cross legged, even now that the injury has healed. I have been kneeling with two cushions and decided to try the bench. I couldn’t be happier. It is so comfortable. I was able to sit very peacefully without uncomfortable pressure in my hips, knees, shins, feet or back. Bravo! I thank you very very much and will recommend this bench to my friends and mentors in my sangha in Los Angeles! I also have a body pillow which I love from your company. I love it so much that I took it with me on a meditation retreat to Thailand in October! Thanks for your great products.

Blessings,

Karen

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I just received my peace bench today, and I just wanted to thank you. I love it! The wood has such a nice feel, and I’m thrilled with how light, portable and handsome it is. And you sent it out so quickly too. Now all I have to do is get my family and friends into meditation, and I’ll have the perfect gift for them :).

Best regards,

Michael

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I love my Peace Bench. It has really improved my ability to focus because I am not sitting in an uncomfortable position.

Your products are great.

Chad

 

I received my Zen Office today and was amazed by how something so simple made such a difference in my posture, breathing, and overall comfort. I’m a bit on the heavy side and found the sky position to be the most effective and comfortable for my body type when using the Peace Bench. As for the Tilt Seat, it’s equally comfortable to sit on when I’m not using it as a laptop desk. I plan to take the Tilt Seat to work with me and banish my uncomfortable office chair to the storage closet!

Josiah

 

Dear Carolina Mornings,

I had lived with chronic back pain for twenty-five years. This pain has awakened me every single night since its inception when I was nineteen years old. I am now forty-four.

I have used inversion tables, physical therapy, stretching (which I still do), yoga (which I still do), special exercises (which I still do), hypnosis for pain, a variety of chiropractors and massage therapists, and even seening accredited “healers” in hopes of getting something more than slight transient relief of this chronic pain.

 

Within two hours of my first usage of the tilt chair and peace bench, I noticed a gradual relieving of the constant strained feeling in my lower back! By the time the first two hours were up, I reported 80% to 90% relief of all back pain and soreness, shoulder stiffness and soreness, and 80% relief of neck soreness, aching and stiffness.

I then tried a few gentle stretches, and my range of motion was increased! That night, after using the tilt chair and having my peace bench on my desk to hold my computer keyboard, I slept FOR THE FIRST ENTIRE NIGHT WITHOUT PAIN SINCE I WAS NINETEEN! I am amazed.

I am so grateful to Carolina Morning and Patrick (the designer) for these wonderful items. They are not advertised as miracle furnishings, but to me they are. I never expected anything like this. I have had no recurring back or neck pain since using the tilt chair and peace bench! I meditate with greater ease using the peace bench. My posture has improved. I feel much more energy! Feelings of fatigue and tension have dropped tremendously, since I don’t wake up in pain and discomfort anymore! I am done with putting chiropractor’s kids through graduate school, and I am tired of making mortgage payments for every so-called “healer” who has claimed they could help my back. I plan to be buried with my tilt chair and peace bench, cause I’m taking them with me forever! With my eternal gratitude,

Wilella Nelson, B.A., B.S.N., R.N.

Customer Testimonials

The EcoBackrest™ became an excellent tool to help educate my body on what exactly were beneficial positions of ease while relaxing. After the ‘right’ amount of lounge sitting, my body would be ready to get up and move again. It is also holding up well to much use.

Lara Sobel

Kirkland, WA

This chair is absolutely amazing! My brother was the first to purchase one and found it to be theÿþ ultimate. I was so impressed by his I bought one 1 month later. Love mine too! So big thanks to Patrick for inventing this chair.

The Nook Fan

 

I bought your Eco Backrest™ set because since I’ve started working from home, I’ve been switching positions at least a few times a day, but I’m finding that the ways I’m sitting and laying are far from healthy! I tried to rig up something like it with pillows I had around the house–but they’re just not cutting it. I also want something that I can move from my bed to my office floor and back easily. I’m super excited to put this to good use!! Thanks so much!

Anonymous

I originally found the article on the ergonomics of sleep when I was looking for a more ergonomic position to sleep in after replacing my old spring mattress with a used futon. I will definitely be saving up for your queen futon set! (And quite possibly 75% of everything else you sell, too! 🙂

I came back for the Eco Backrest set because since I’ve started working from home, I’ve been switching positions at least a few times a day, but I’m finding that the ways I’m sitting and laying are far from healthy! I came up with something similar to the yoga lounge with asome random pillows I had around the house–but they’re just not cutting it. I also want something that I can move from my bed to my office floor and back easily. I’m super excited to put this to good use!! Thanks so much!

Carolyn Eilola,
St. Regis Falls, NY

Yoga Lounge

I originally thought that I would send it back because I was hoping it would be wider, but after trying the mat I was amazed at how comfortable it is. I am housebound due to a chronic illness and spend most of the day lying down. I was using the couch, but now I have switched to the floor and spend most of the day on this mat. I highly recommend the mat. The fact that it is narrow makes it much more versatile since it is easy to reposition. It has settled some in the past two weeks since I have used it but it is still very full with lots of loft. Deconditioning is a real concern for someone like myself who is bed bound. Being on the floor allows me to move around more, stretch and even do some gentle yoga. I am getting more exercise and movement even while resting. I intend to make more purchases to complete my new seating arrangement.

Meditation Basics: The Art of Natural Sitting

The “Meditation Posture” is easily recognized, so much so that it has become an icon. Everyday in print media about any subject, advertisers find ways to depict people sitting in a somewhat cross-legged position. Usually the head is thrown back with neck jutting forward and the face has a fake and exaggeratedly blissed out expression. This position is neither healthy, nor sustainable. This is more of a pose than a way to sit. It takes so much effort to hold this pose that it won’t last a second longer than it takes to click the shutter. This false, popularized symbol for what meditation is supposed to look like is conceived by those who have neither practiced meditation nor plan to.

The reason: these people are sitting on a flat surface. When sitting on a flat surface, (unless you have been trained this way which is 1% of the population) it’s almost worse than sitting on a chair or sofa. The muscular of the front torso has to strain to keep the body from collapsing backward. If more people realized that there is a way to sit without back support that is not only practically effortless, but increases the power of concentration, lowers heart rate, decreases blood pressure, deepens breathing, and stimulates the ‘relaxation response’, they would probably give it a try.

The funny thing is, this ‘natural sitting’ technique from the outset looks almost like the first way of sitting described, which doesn’t work at all for meditation or anything else other than a pretty photo. Many of us go into meditation with preconceived notions about sitting and posture.

“Good posture” is not the military tightening of the shoulders with an erect back. That takes effort and unbalanced muscular activity. In fact, ‘posture’ isn’t even the word to describe the activity of meditation.

Meditation is an activity, not some static ‘holding’ of the body. In fact, holding the body is akin to ‘body armor’, which is just what we are trying to dissolve with meditation. Meditation is a ‘neutral’ state, it is a state of repose, looseness, relaxation, melting, zero, reset.

It is sitting with a relaxed body without pain, struggle or difficulty. That is: the physical body is trying to find a place where it can “let go”, so the mind, spirit, or emotions can work on whatever they have to, without being hindered or blocked by the body.

There is a koan or dichotomy in this ‘meditation posture’. By settling down the body in this consciously controlled way, the mind is freed from its constant distractedness. It is now has to face itself. By stopping the body’s outward movement, the mind is now able to find new levels of awareness, which is a form of movement. The reason “posture” isn’t the best word to describe meditation is because there is very much movement inside the sitting. The body is in a state of “tonus” which means there is an equal balance of work between complimentary and opposing muscle groups. The muscles involved from the front are working with and against those of the back. There is a constant interchange.

The reason this isn’t exhausting is because when the weight of the body is balanced evenly front and back, there is very little work left to do. Basically, it is a matter of maintaining that balance, the way a tree sways in the wind. The only way these muscles can be balanced between the front and the back is by either standing, or by mimicking the angle of the spine by sitting on a sloped surface. This sloped surface tilts the pelvis almost as it would be when standing.

There is one exception to this rule–the ‘lotus’ position, which is sitting on a flat surface in a true cross-legged stance. In true ‘lotus’, the pelvis is tilted mechanically by the extreme force placed on it from the legs which are stretched under the calves and rest on top of the thighs. However, this advanced yoga asana is only for a tiny minority who can achieve such an extreme stretching of the legs, and many people have caused personal injury–mostly to the knees–who have sat lotus for a long time.

There are several obstacles to finding this state of perfect repose. 1–Improper technique or knowledge of how the body works. 2–The body may be out of alignment. 3–Muscles used in sitting have atrophied from years of sitting in chairs. 4–Your sitting equipment may not fit you or have some other technical issue. Very often, some or all of these factors will cause a one problems with finding that mythical state of perfect equilibrium until one finally gives up and finds a chair.

Chair sitting is certainly possible for meditation, but it does not provide the potential of the “meditation posture”. Also, it can lead to other problems not only for meditation but for other aspects of life. 1–Improper technique: Chair sitting is completely unnatural and we have grown up in a culture that revolves around the chair. Most of our waking hours are spent in a chair. Parents force kids to sit in them. They strap them to chairs at an early age which deforms the skeletal and musculature systems, and dampens their instinctual knowledge of wise body use. (Indians strapped infants to a board to wear them on the back or hang in a tree–in standing position.) So we come to meditation with a lifetime of improper use and ideas.

Here is a very good video deomstrating the ideas in this article.

http://anmolmehta.com/blog/2007/04/18/free-online-guided-meditation-book-zen-meditation-technique-ch-1/

Read this website, read the books offered on this website, and find qualified instructors of the Feldenkrais Method. Yoga is very complimentary to a healthy back and can enhance meditation. Unfortunately, even yoga instructors usually do not understand the problems with chairs and the principles of wise body movement. They even use unhealthy backrests in the yoga classes for students to lean back on. These canvas floor seats are actually worse than chairs!

2–Alignment means the bones, joints and muscles are working smoothly together with symmetry and balance. It would be amazing if a person beginning this way of sitting wasn’t out of alignment. Our physical environment and the way we interact with it shapes our bodies. Chair sitting creates a condition known as “adaptive slumped posture” or “front loading”. The muscles in the front (shoulders, chest, abdominals) work harder than those in back, and sculpt a body that tends to pull itself unnaturally forward. This can then lead to problems in other areas of the body, like a domino effect. These problems can become severe and lead to joint degeneration from uneven wear. We have become adapted to chairs. Chairs support the status quo of a “front loaded” body. That’s why at first they may seem more comfortable and relaxing than autonomous sitting. It takes an open mind and a desire for balance, health, and the benefits of meditation for a person to want to change. The transition is not always easy. In order to make it work, other practices should be considered for increasing flexibility, balance and symmetry, such as yoga, chiropractic, rolfing, massage, craniosacral therapy, the Alexander Technique. Also, there are many self-therapies that are very useful, such as the Ma Rollerª, Miracle Ballsª, therapy balls. and others.

3–Muscles that have atrophied from sitting in chairs will get sore. Start autonomous sitting in small bits, and work your way to longer sits as you can. Practice plenty of stretching in-between sitting.

4–The seat must fit. If a seat is too tall, it may cut off circulation where the seat meets the thighs. If it’s too short, the pelvis isn’t tilted sufficiently and there will be slumping. In general, the wider the sitting surface, the easier it will be to sit, because the weight of the body is spread across more surface area to prevent bruising and circulation blocks. If your legs tingle and fall asleep, try another seat.

The principles of comfortable, healthy sitting can be applied to sitting in a chair. If the seat of a chair is tilted somehow, either by placing one inch blocks underneath the rear legs, or by placing a ‘wedge cushion’ (Tilt Seat™ cushion with stuffing pushed to the rear) on the seat, it becomes effective for autonomous sitting.

The floor cushions and benches have a few advantages–lower center of gravity, simple, easy for a large group, humble and ‘down to earth’– but some people have trouble getting up and down or assuming the positions which take greater flexibility. For this group, and others, we have created the Tilt Seat™. Also, somewhere between a Tilt Seat™ and a Zafu or Peace Bench is the “sky position”. The sitter is not as high as a chair or tilt seatª but not as low as a zafu or kneeling bench. The knees are lower than the hips, but still not touching the mat or floor. There is minimal stretch in the thighs and no pressure on the knees. Many have found the answer with this position, which can be achieved with either an extra large bench or a smile cushion or zafu with a support cushion under it.

Click here for illustrated instructions on the different sitting positions.

Back, Head, Shoulders

“Wise Use” of the body starts with the head. The head should be positioned “forward and up”. That means the chin should be parallel with the floor, so you can easily look down at a 45 degree angle to the floor. (Many people make the mistake of bending the neck up. This throws the whole back out of alignment.) Correct positioning of the head should help you naturally align you back.

You should feel a slight arch in your lower back. Play with the balance until you find a place that feels comfortable. Do not strain. When done properly this way of sitting is comfortable and effortless. Your ears and your shoulders should be on one vertical line. Relax your shoulders, and push up towards the ceiling with the back of your head. Also to gain strength in your posture, press your diaphragm down towards your hara, or lower abdomen. This will help you maintain physical and mental balance.

Arms & Hands

You can place your hands on your thighs or on a small pillow on your lap. Hold your elbows freely and easily, and slightly away from your body. This helps keep your shoulders from slouching. If you would like further assistance, contact us for Meditation Tech Support.